in & around Food Cravings

A food craving is an intense desire to consume a specific food, stronger than simply normal hunger. According to Marcia Levin Pelchat "It may be the way in which foods are consumed (e.g. alternating access and restriction) rather than their sensory properties that leads to an addictive eating pattern." There is no single explanation for food cravings, and explanations range from low serotonin levels affecting the brain centers for appetite to production of endorphins as a result of consuming fats and carbohydrates. Foods with high levels of sugar glucose, such as chocolate, are more frequently craved than foods with lower sugar glucose, such as broccoli because when glucose interacts with opiod system in the brain an addictive triggering effect occurs. The consumer of the glucose feels the urge to consume more glucose, much like an alcoholic, because the brain has become conditioned to release "happy hormones" every time glucose is present.

The craving of non-food items as food is called pica. Taste addiction disorder is a psychological condition with a biochemical basis in the brain where a person develops an obsessive/compulsive relationship to food. Certain foods are craved more than others because of their glucose content. When the glucose level rises, the brain produces more dopamine, which drenches the brain in "happy hormones". Over time a person can become addicted to the release of the dopamine because this may be their only way of attaining this feeling. Other ways of giving the brain a dopamine bath include, but are not limited to, singing, running, dancing, laughing with other people, or engaging in sex. TAD functions biochemically in a parallel way to other compulsive behavior addictions such as alcoholism, drug addiction, anorexia, bulimia, and sex addiction. Addiction to certain foods has a biochemical basis and evidence because according to the research of Avena and her colleagues "Neural adaptations include changes in dopamine and opioid receptor binding, enkephalin mRNA expression and dopamine and acetylcholine release in the nucleus accumbens." This essentially means that the brain physically changes when it becomes used to consuming a mass quantity of a certain chemical so that the brain can release the highest quantity of dopamine possible.

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Colon Care

The colon, or large intestine, is an important part of the digestive system. It has been referred to as the sewer system of the body. Some five feet in length and 2.5 inches in diameter, situated at the end of the alimentary canal.

It is the place where we store the waste material that most of us would rather not think about and most of us don't, until our health becomes poor or we feel bloated, constipated, or have diarrhoea. 80% of all disease and discomfort is related to an unclean colon - due to impacted faecal matter. It may be said that almost every chronic disease known, is directly or indirectly due to the influence of bacterial poisons absorbed from the intestine.

If we neglect and abuse our colon, it becomes a cesspool, and if we don't get rid of the toxins, they just keep building up and are reabsorbed into the blood creating autointoxication or self-poisoning.This results in a dramatically weakened immune system, poisons the digestive organs, so that we become distressed and bloated, and poisons the blood. The skin becomes unhealthy. In short, every organ of the body is poisoned and we age prematurely, looking and feeling old. The joints become stiff and painful, the eyes become dull, sluggish brain, and in the end leads to debilitating health problems, including colon cancer. The five foot long tube we call the colon, or large intestine, determines whether or not the body is polluted.

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