in & around Abdominal Bloating

Abdominal bloating is any abnormal general swelling, or increase in diameter of the abdominal area. As a symptom, the patient feels a full and tight abdomen, which may cause abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by increased borborygmus or more seriously the total lack of borborygmus. The most common symptom associated with bloating is a sensation that the abdomen is full or distended. Rarely, bloating may be painful or cause shortness of breath. Pains that are due to bloating will feel sharp and cause the stomach to cramp. These pains may occur anywhere in the body and can change locations quickly. They are so painful that they are sometimes mistaken for heart pains when they develop on the upper left side of the chest. Pains on the right side are often confused with problems in the appendix or the gallbladder. One symptom of gas that is not normally associated with it is the hiccup. Hiccups are harmless and will diminish on their own; they also help to release gas that is in the digestive tract before it moves down to the intestines and causes bloating. Important but uncommon causes of abdominal bloating include ascites and tumors. There are many causes of bloating, including: diet, irritable bowel syndrome, lactose intolerance, reflux, and constipation, to name a few. Specific medical conditions like Crohn's Disease or bowel obstruction can also contribute to the amount of stomach bloating experienced. Gas and bloating is a sign that food is not being ingested correctly by the body. An inadequate intake of water will cause excessive stomach bloating. Water benefits the body by aiding with digestion because it supports a majority of the body's daily functions. Fatty foods cause a formation of fat cells to develop throughout the body and contribute to bloating as well. A build up of fat cells slows down the body's ability to empty the stomach. Dairy products also contribute to excessive cramps, gas, and bloating. Persons who are intolerant to lactose products experience this effect more than others. Once these foods are digested, the bloating will fade.

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Colon Care

The colon, or large intestine, is an important part of the digestive system. It has been referred to as the sewer system of the body. Some five feet in length and 2.5 inches in diameter, situated at the end of the alimentary canal.

It is the place where we store the waste material that most of us would rather not think about and most of us don't, until our health becomes poor or we feel bloated, constipated, or have diarrhoea. 80% of all disease and discomfort is related to an unclean colon - due to impacted faecal matter. It may be said that almost every chronic disease known, is directly or indirectly due to the influence of bacterial poisons absorbed from the intestine.

If we neglect and abuse our colon, it becomes a cesspool, and if we don't get rid of the toxins, they just keep building up and are reabsorbed into the blood creating autointoxication or self-poisoning.This results in a dramatically weakened immune system, poisons the digestive organs, so that we become distressed and bloated, and poisons the blood. The skin becomes unhealthy. In short, every organ of the body is poisoned and we age prematurely, looking and feeling old. The joints become stiff and painful, the eyes become dull, sluggish brain, and in the end leads to debilitating health problems, including colon cancer. The five foot long tube we call the colon, or large intestine, determines whether or not the body is polluted.

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